ryanpanos:

Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.


Holy shit, I spent a buttload of time at Rolling Acres growing up. My mom even worked there seasonally a few times, mostly with the Santa photo thing.I remember it being pretty spiffy when I was young, I remember it declining, then I stopped going… then I heard it closed. Now this.The tower fountains - that orange tile and metal ruin in the picture - those were the coolest thing when you’re 6. They looked like the Emerald City. ryanpanos:

Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.


Holy shit, I spent a buttload of time at Rolling Acres growing up. My mom even worked there seasonally a few times, mostly with the Santa photo thing.I remember it being pretty spiffy when I was young, I remember it declining, then I stopped going… then I heard it closed. Now this.The tower fountains - that orange tile and metal ruin in the picture - those were the coolest thing when you’re 6. They looked like the Emerald City. ryanpanos:

Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.


Holy shit, I spent a buttload of time at Rolling Acres growing up. My mom even worked there seasonally a few times, mostly with the Santa photo thing.I remember it being pretty spiffy when I was young, I remember it declining, then I stopped going… then I heard it closed. Now this.The tower fountains - that orange tile and metal ruin in the picture - those were the coolest thing when you’re 6. They looked like the Emerald City. ryanpanos:

Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.


Holy shit, I spent a buttload of time at Rolling Acres growing up. My mom even worked there seasonally a few times, mostly with the Santa photo thing.I remember it being pretty spiffy when I was young, I remember it declining, then I stopped going… then I heard it closed. Now this.The tower fountains - that orange tile and metal ruin in the picture - those were the coolest thing when you’re 6. They looked like the Emerald City. ryanpanos:

Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.


Holy shit, I spent a buttload of time at Rolling Acres growing up. My mom even worked there seasonally a few times, mostly with the Santa photo thing.I remember it being pretty spiffy when I was young, I remember it declining, then I stopped going… then I heard it closed. Now this.The tower fountains - that orange tile and metal ruin in the picture - those were the coolest thing when you’re 6. They looked like the Emerald City. ryanpanos:

Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via
When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 
Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 
The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.


Holy shit, I spent a buttload of time at Rolling Acres growing up. My mom even worked there seasonally a few times, mostly with the Santa photo thing.I remember it being pretty spiffy when I was young, I remember it declining, then I stopped going… then I heard it closed. Now this.The tower fountains - that orange tile and metal ruin in the picture - those were the coolest thing when you’re 6. They looked like the Emerald City.

ryanpanos:

Black Friday-The Collapse of the American Shopping Mall | Seph Lawless | Via

When they were built in the 1970s these two gleaming Ohio malls were symbols of the boom years in the U.S., and their wide walkways were filled with shoppers. 

Now the verdant foliage that decorated them has died off and the fountains inside are dry as store after store deserted the out-of-town malls. 

The demise of the Rolling Acres and and Randall Park Mall have been documented by photographer Seph Lawless, who remembers visiting them when he was a child and even had his first job at one of the them.

Holy shit, I spent a buttload of time at Rolling Acres growing up. My mom even worked there seasonally a few times, mostly with the Santa photo thing.

I remember it being pretty spiffy when I was young, I remember it declining, then I stopped going… then I heard it closed. Now this.

The tower fountains - that orange tile and metal ruin in the picture - those were the coolest thing when you’re 6. They looked like the Emerald City.

spiderjewel:

New activity in the mozenrath tag

@johnqpotamus spiderjewel:

New activity in the mozenrath tag

@johnqpotamus

spiderjewel:

New activity in the mozenrath tag

@johnqpotamus

pokemondaycares:

'oh gross it's dark chocolate i hate dark chocolate' good

give it to me

I wish making real money worked like Animal Crossing. Sell some fruit, save $1000 for a trip to a lovely tropical island, catch bugs for a few hours, come back with $180k.

ursulavernon:

I would like this house to be airlifted into my garden, please.

Those stairs make me freak out just looking at them.

They’re like a stairs, but a ladder, with no handrail, why

(Source: naturehomes)

joeeatspeople:

yesidolikecoatsbigtime:

Types of people who romanticize small town life:

  1. People who didn’t grow up in small towns

#THE LOCALS AREN’T QUIRKY#THEY’RE RACIST

(Source: thatssoproblematic)

iamnotlanuk:

Again I say, one of the most important shows on television.

(Source: clionona)

ttheshindigg:

You can’t control the Prince Of All Saiyans.

ttheshindigg:

You can’t control the Prince Of All Saiyans.

deep-dark-fears:

A fear submitted by coziestbean to deep-dark-fears.

I always think of that - I think it was Goosebumps - book where a kid was invisible or dead or something. It’s a common theme in speculative fiction - I’m pretty sure Twilight Zone and X-Files did it too.

I always worry for a split second, when I greet multiple people but nobody responds, that I’m actually invisible, shifted to a dimension a half-inch away.

  1. Camera: Epson GT-15000

iamnotlanuk:

I like how when Disney decided to make Hercules, instead of dealing with Zeus having a lot of part mortal bastards, they just made Superman. With the son of Olympus instead of Krypton.

iamnotlanuk:

ripelypine:

my favourite part of shakespeare plays is the person at the end that is like “see how these people fucked everything up. don’t do this. look at this fuckery. look at it. fuck this. fuck everything.”

I was telling my sister the other day how I want Game of Thrones to end just like this, with a bunch of dead bodies near the Iron Throne, and Varys is just there talking about the realm and the folly of those who play the game of thrones.

Like seriously, I can’t even play fucking Animal Crossing because I’m getting distracted by opening and closing tabs on my browser and that game literally requires the least amount of effort possible short of sleeping.

I am so restless and want to Do A Thing, especially with the gorgeous 75-degree spring day outside… but I am so flighty and confused that I can’t actually get anything done. This med is fucking weird and I hope I adjust to it, and I’m not just stuck with Loopy Brain Fog.

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

teadalek:

madeofparts:

STARRING: A MODERATELY ATTRACTIVE WHITE ACTOR, ANOTHER MODERATELY ATTRACTIVE WHITE ACTOR, AND SOME BACKGROUND LADIES I GUESS

(Source: still-sophistory)